Regional Dishes in Indonesia

Indonesian cuisine often demonstrates complex flavour acquired from certain ingredients and bumbu spices mixture. Indonesian dishes have rich flavours; most often described as gurih (savory which equate to umami) and pedas(hot and spicy), and also combination of basic tastes such as manis (sweet), asin (salty), asam (sour) and pahit (bitter). Five main Indonesian cooking methods are goreng (frying), bakar (roasting) or panggang (grilling), tumis (stir frying), rebus (boiling) and kukus (steaming).

Soto Bandung

Posted at 29 Sep 2014

In Indonesian cuisine, soto, sroto, tauto, or coto is a traditional soup mainly composed of broth, meat and vegetables. Many traditional soups are called soto, whereas foreign and Western influenced soups are called sop.

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Ayam Goreng

Posted at 29 Sep 2014

Ayam goreng is a generic term to refer to various kinds of Indonesian and Malaysian dish of chicken deep fried in coconut oil. Ayam goreng literally means "fried chicken" in Indonesian and Malay. Unlike Southern United States style fried chicken, this Southeast Asian version is absent of batter coated flour and richer in spices.

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Betutu

Posted at 29 Sep 2014

Betutu is a Balinese dish of steamed or roasted chicken or duck. This highly seasoned and spiced dish is a popular dish in Bali and Lombok. An even spicier version is available using extra-spicy sauce made from uncooked (raw) onion slices mixed with red chili peppers and coconut oil.

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Bubur Ayam

Posted at 29 Sep 2014

Bubur ayam (Indonesian for "chicken congee") is an Indonesian chicken congee. It is rice congee with shredded chicken meat served with some condiments, such as chopped scallion, crispy fried shallot, celery, tongcay (preserved salted vegetables), fried soybean, Chinese crullers (youtiao, known as cakwe in Indonesia), both salty and sweet soy sauce, and sometimes it is topped with yellow chicken broth and kerupuk (Indonesian style crackers).

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Empal Gentong

Posted at 29 Sep 2014

Empal gentong is a spicy curry-like beef soup originated from Cirebon, West Java. This soup is similar to gulai that usually cooked with firewood stove in gentong (Javanese for: clay pot). The ingredients are parts of beef meat, intestine, tripes, lungs, etc. cooked in curry-like spices in coconut milk, kucai and sambal in the form of chilli powder. Empal gentong can be eaten with steamed rice, ketupat or lontong. Empal gentong originated from Battembat village, kecamatan Tengah Tani, Cirebon regency.

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