Music/Instrument in Indonesia

Indonesia is also strong in the performing arts including dance and music performance. The beautiful Ramayana dance drama is enacted during the dry season at the large open stage at Prambanan near Yogyakarta under a tropical full moon and against the dramatic illuminated background of this 9th.century temple with live music like Gong and Gamelan on the site. Indonesia’s dances are colourful, dramatic or entertaining. They vary from the highly synchronized “saman” song and dance from Aceh, to the sedate and sophisticated court dances from Java accompanied by the liquid sounds of the gamelan orchestra, to the war dances of Kalimantan, Papua, and Sulawesi. Each of these performance involve musician team with its traditional instruments. Chinese influence can be seen along the entire north coast of Java from the batik patterns of Cirebon and Pekalongan, to the finely carved furniture and doors of Kudus in Central Java, as also in the intricate gold embroidered wedding costumes of West Sumatra. But Indonesia does not live in the past alone. Today, in music, in metropolitan Jakarta, the Java Jazz Festival is the annual meeting highlight for top international and Indonesian jazz musicians. Indonesia also boasts some of the best rock and pop bands and singers who never fail to create a sensation wherever they appear in Indonesia as also in Malaysia and Singapore.

Gong

Posted at 30 Sep 2014

Gong is a percussion instrument that is well known in South East Asia and East Asia. This gong is used for traditional musical instruments. Currently not many crafters gong like this.

Gong that has been forged yet determined tone. Gong tones newly formed after rinsed and cleaned. If the tone is still not fit, so the layer of bronze gongs scraped becomes thinner. South Korea also called Kkwaenggwari. But kkwaenggwari made ​​of brass colored metal is played in a manner supported by the fifth finger and played by being hit a short stick. How to hold kkwaenggwari using five finger turned out to have special usefulness, because one finger (index finger) can be used to dampen the vibration of gongs and tinkling reduce the volume produced.

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Kendang

Posted at 30 Sep 2014

The typical double-sided membrane drums are known throughout Maritime Southeast Asia and India. One of the oldest image of kendang can be found in ancient temples in Indonesia, especially the ninth century Borobudur and Prambanan temple.

Among the Javanese, Sundanese, or Malay peoples, the kendang has one side larger than the other, with the larger, lower-pitched side usually placed to the right, and are usually placed on stands horizontally and hit with the hands one either side while seated on the floor. Among groups like the Balinese, Tausug, or Maranao, both sides are of equal size,and are played on either one or both sides using a combination of hands and/or sticks.

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Moku Drum

Posted at 30 Sep 2014

Moko are bronze kettledrums from Alor Island, Indonesia,While they have been found in several different locations in Indonesia, they are most famously associated with the island of Alor, where they have long been prized in ceremonial exchanges. Later moko were made in China and Java and were brought to Alor in the 19th century.

Some scholars identify the design and decorations have their likely origin in Đông Sơn the centre of the Đông Sơn culture in Vietnam. However, it remains a mystery as to how the older Đông Sơn drums arrived in Alor. Local origin stories describe the discovery of mokos buried in the ground, and it is still common to hear of moko being uncovered in this way.

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