Culture & Life in Indonesia

On the whole the Indonesian people are religious in nature. Eventhough, they are still true to the Pancasila, the five principles of nationhood, - namely Belief in the One and Only God, a Just and Civilized Humanity, the Unity of Indonesia, Democracy through unanimous deliberations, and Social Justice for all - Indonesian societies are open and remain tolerant towards one another’s religion, customs and traditions, all the while faithfully adhering to their own. Therefore, even Indonesia consist of hundred of Ethnic Groups, bears the motto: Bhinneka Tunggal Ika – Unity in Diversity. Although today’s youth especially in the large cities is modern and follow international trends, yet when it comes to weddings, couples still adhere to traditions on the side of both the bride’s and bridegroom’s parents. So in a mixed ethnic wedding, the vows and wedding traditions may follow the bride’s family’s, while during the reception elaborate decorations and costumes follow the groom’s ethnic traditions, or vice versa. Weddings and wedding receptions in Indonesia are a great introduction to Indonesia’s many and diverse customs and traditions. Weddings are often also occasions to display one’s social status, wealth and fashion sense. Even in villages, hundreds or even thousands of wedding invitees line up to congratulate the couple and their parents who are seated on stage, and then enjoy the wedding feast and entertainment.

Toraja People

Posted at 29 Sep 2014

The Spectacular beauty of nature, Tana Toraja are safely protected by the lofty mountains and rugged granite cliffs of the central highlands of the island of Sulawesi. 

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Sasak Tribe: The origins of Lombok

Posted at 29 Sep 2014

The Sasak are the indigenous people of the island of Lombok. Like many ethnic groups in Indonesia, they belong to the Austronesians who migrated from mainland Asia some 5,000 years BC to populate South East Asia all the way to the South Pacific Islands.

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The Baliem Valley Festival in Papua Wamena

Posted at 29 Sep 2014

The Baliem Valley is nestled in the central highlands of Papua lying at an altitude of about 1,800m, surrounded by a crest of steep green mountains and home to three of Papua’s interior tribes: the Dani, Lani and Yali tribes. The Dani live in the centre, the Lani tribe in the west and the Yali tribe in the south east. Although this is one of the most densely populated areas of Papua, and these groups have lived in this area for thousands of years, the Baliem valley has only recently been discovered by Westerners when American Richard Archbold noticed beautiful terraced fields dotted through the valley from his plane in 1938. The Baliem valley is bisected by the Baliem river which flows from Mt. Trikora, through the Baliem Valley before reaching the Arafura Sea.

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